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The Tao of Sports Podcast – The Definitive Sports, Marketing, Business Industry News Podcast

Sports Revenue Analytics veteran Troy Kirby interviews the team behind the teams in Front Offices and Athletics Departments throughout the world, revealing an industry of specialists and minds unseen by the local or national media. Examined in this podcast are current or long-standing industry topics; tickets, business, analytics, moneyball, revenue, finance, economy, sales and jobs of the NCAA, NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL. Also included are topics surrounding third party vendors, sports business, revenue, marketing, mentoring interns, facilities, managing employees, as well as how to not only break into sports, but stay in the industry long-term. The often-invisible side of the industry is where the Tao of Sports Podcast attempts to pull back the elusive curtain, providing information both to industry insiders and those who want to work in sports.
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The Tao of Sports Podcast – The Definitive Sports, Marketing, Business Industry News Podcast
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Now displaying: Category: sports journalism
Mar 30, 2017

Just a year after coming on the podcast (Ep. 624), author Dan Schlossberg is back with his latest book, The New Baseball Bible. Schlossberg covers everything known, and many things typically unknown, about the game of baseball, as well breaks down some of the mythos that have occurred around the sport. This includes whether the candy bar Baby Ruth was named after Babe Ruth (it wasn't), and the numerology around Hank Aaron's uniform number 44 and why Wade Boggs ate so much chicken and had to do batting practice at exactly 7:17 before each game. Schlossberg also gets into a heated discussion about the current state of the game, especially the Hall of Fame chances of the current steroid-era players. Twitter: @Braves1

Sep 9, 2016

Fresh off of being named one of the Forbes 30 under 30 in the sports category, SportTechie senior writer Mark Burns discusses the state of sports journalism today. Burns talks about some of the ways to gather sources on stories, as well as ensure that quotes aren't taken out of context, and highlights issues with aggregation which may lose context amid overall content. Burns shares his thoughts on reporting in general, and whether he is a journalism as much as a content creator, and what that means for the future of reporting overall. Twitter: @MarkJBurns88

Aug 19, 2016

The Chicago Cubs were one of the luckiest teams at the start of the 1900s, according to former Associated Press writer Hal Bock, author of the book, The Last Chicago Cubs Dynasty. Bock covers the entire Cubs reign to the World Series from 1906 to 1910, complete with the biographies of some of the more illustrious characters in Major League Baseball History. Bock talks about the legendary double-play combination of Tinker to Evers to Chance, whether Cubs catcher Johnny Kling should be held responsible for bringing bad luck by leaving the team for a promising billiards career, and what the "Merkle boner" did for the 1908 playoffs to send the Cubs back to the World Series. Twitter: @hbock1

Aug 12, 2016

The transition from first career to second career is one of the more difficult retirement discussions any professional athlete has to make. Devon Teeple is one of the better success stories, moving from a promising minor league baseball career to the world of finance and blogging. Teeple discusses how his life has changed since he made that decision, along with being mentored by several sports writers in order to develop his own voice on the blogging platform, The GM's Perspective. Teeple shares insight into how athletes view the media, as well as how to ensure that he is also promoting some of the better sides of an athlete's life, including their charity work. Twitter: @DevonTeeple

Jul 1, 2016

Jess Root represents the new form of digital sports journalism, even if he himself doesn't consider the term "journalist" to fit what he's doing. Root has overseen a passion project call CardsWire over the last 6 years, and is now affiliated with USA Today in the hopes of covering the Arizona Cardinals with the intensity of a fan, but the writing coverage of the press. Root discusses how he has managed to do both CardsWire and his full-time regular job, as well as create engaging content throughout an entire week. Root's coverage means expanding on certain points, Cardinals personnel quotes and statistics in order to foster a greater growth of information for each CardsWire reader. Twitter: @senorjessroot

Mar 24, 2016

In the annals of baseball history, nothing even comes close to the regular season winning success of the Atlanta Braves from 1991 to 2005. Former AP Writer and SABR member Dan Schlossberg details the unprecedented success of the Braves in his book, "When The Braves Ruled Baseball: Fourteen Flags Over Atlanta" starting with General Manager Bobby Cox's trade for John Smoltz, to David Justice, Terry Pendleton, Chipper Jones, Tom Glavine and the free agent signing of Greg Maddux. Schlossberg shares some of the insight he gleaned from interviews with former Braves executives, including the differential in budgets from owner Ted Turner from 1991-95 compared to those from 1996-2005 under conglomerate Time Warner. Though only one World Series win during that record run by the Braves, Schlossberg mentions the amount of above-average players such as Denny Neagle, Bruce Chen and Ryan Klesko, who were traded on an absolutely talented roster as the Braves marched on, each year, for the 14 straight seasons, to the playoffs and several World Series.

 

Click to order "When The Braves Ruled Baseball: Fourteen Flags Over Atlanta" today!

Jan 8, 2016

There are many cross-sections of the sports business environment, but none are probably as bizarre as the true urban legends of the past. Arnie "Tokyo" Rosenthal is a part of that rich history, with his ability to con himself through New York Yankees media relations from 1977 to 1984, as a member of the media. Rosenthal relates his story of getting the ultimate access pass, and seeing some of the legends of baseball up close and personal, while also honing his photography skills. Rosenthal talks about the time he met Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle in 1978, even getting his picture snapped with them, as well as seeing "The Boss" George Steinbrenner in an adjacent luxury suite. Rosenthal was never caught, quitting the con game on his own terms after the 1984 season, but ended up confessing over a decade later to some of the former Yankees brass for a few lasting laughs. Twitter: @TokyoRosenthal

Arnie's memoir, A Fauxtographer's Yankee Stadium Memoir, is available at Amazon.

Nov 20, 2015

Kevin Kleps represents the changing world of sports business, crossing over from traditional financial coverage at Crains Cleveland Business to cover the sports business segmentation of the major Ohio city. Kleps starts off with his assessment of how to build not only a reputation within the sports business beat, but also sources that can help yield information otherwise not found anywhere else. Kleps talks about his surprise at how the internal coverage of sports radio stations locally can grab the attention of the readership, as well as his re-enforcement of bringing a blog and podcast into the mix of his weekly print writing. Kleps reassures everyone listening that the Cleveland Browns are still the major sports business news item, right down to the coverage of the Browns ownership, amid outside legal issues and draft decisions which haven't worked in the NFL franchise's favor. Twitter: @KevinKleps

Oct 30, 2015

Back on Ep. 235, Bill Bradley was a digital editor for an NFL-funded platform. Now, he is leading the Las Vegas Review Journal as their sports editor, bringing a very tech-focused background to reporting stories in Sin City. Bradley discusses some of the ways that technology such as video, photos and audio can be incorporated around the written word when covering a beat. Bradley talks about the new beat focus of MMA camps, of getting in-depth stories about fighters in order to broaden the reach of the LRJ readership. Bradley expands on the new arena on the Las Vegas Strip, as well as the potential NHL franchise and the team name that Bradley believes is a lock to be selected when the team possibly starts play in 2017. Twitter: @BillBradleyLV

Oct 16, 2015

As journalism embraces or faces the changing landscape of technology, various questions arise to how to best implement its application. Jeff Sharon is witnessing this first-hand, overseeing the online masters degree program of journalism at Full Sail University. A former sports writer for Genesis Communications covering the University of Central Florida athletic department, Sharon shares his view of how developing stories is changing, as well as how the role of the journalist is becoming less about being part of a major company, and instead, becoming more of a freelancer. Sharon talks about how this changing model will affect the ability to either gain scoops on information, what details will now be released to the public that in the past would have not made the grade in a newspaper or TV station, and how a journalist's ability to deduce not only facts, but maintain principles, will be placed squarely on their shoulders, rather than having a larger organization surrounding them. Twitter: @Jeff_Sharon

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